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Sunday, 11 November 2012

Independence Day in Poland

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In his speech on Poland's Independence Day President Bronisław Komorowski called for respect for political adversaries. "There is one Poland and we must not curse and exclude one another," he said.

 

In a speech delivered at the Tomb of Unknown Soldier in Warsaw's Pilsudski Square (named after Marshal Jozef Pilsudski who declared Poland's independence after 123 years of partitions on Nov. 11, 1918) Komorowski opined that "disputes going beyond (acceptable) dimensions, (due) restraint and common sense have begun to poison our political life." See also: President hands state medals on Independence Day

 

"Accusations of the gravest crimes against our state have been made too easily. Let the tragic experience of pre-war Poland be a warning to us and encourage us to make wise use of our freedom," the president went on.

 

He recalled that when the heroes of Polish independence struggle of 1918 began fighting for power a few years later Poland paid a steep price, including the "bitter developments symbolised by the May, 1926 coup d'etat."

 

Reborn Poland was created by politicians of highly divergent views and very different biographies, the president recalled. They entered the newly established state holding their particular views and dreams of future Poland that were often contradictory.

 

Among the founding fathers of reborn Polish state were socialists, nationalists, agrarians, conservatives and progressives, Komorowski noted.

 

"There should be more respect for adversaries and rivals in (present day) Polish politics (..) No one has a monopoly on truth in democracy," Komorowski remarked.
 

"On this exceptional day, November 11, the National Independence Day, we strongly feel that we are another leg in the great national relay of generations," the president went on. The relay runners hand over the most precious asset, i.e. own, sovereign and democratic Polish state, he added. "We all have the right to national pride (..) Poland is a sovereign, secure, modern and internationally respected state."

 

The ceremonies in the Pilsudski Square were attended by Sejm and Senate speakers, ministers, MPs, generals, churchmen, veterans, pathfinders and hundreds of Warsaw residents. Later most of them joined the March for Independent Poland along Warsaw's historical street route. The march, led by President Komorowski and his wife Anna, attracted ca. 10,000 people, including left- and right-wing politicians as well as families with children waving national flags. (PAP)

 

 

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